Maine Snowmobile Laws,
Rules and Regulations

Maine snowmobile trail groomer for sale - Tucker Sno-Cat

Snowmobile Trail Groomer for Sale

Tucker Sno-Cat Model 2000C-28-6



NEW SNOWMOBILE LAWS

Last year, there were 241 snowmobile accidents and seven fatalities on Maine trails. Speed and alcohol were major causes.

  1. Ride Right - A new law for this year prohibits a snowmobile operator from riding left of center on a trail when approaching or navigating a curve, corner, grade or hill. Now, if wardens will ticket you if they spot you riding on the left in these situations. Previously, they would place lane dividers in the trail and ticket those who could not maintain their lane because of too high a speed.
  2. Drunk Driving - A law banning drunken driving on a snowmobile trail will also be enforced this year.
  3. Helmets Required - A snowmobile may NOT be operated on a snowmobile trail identified by the Bureau of Parks and Lands as having been funded by the Snowmobile Trail Fund by any person under 18 years of age who is not wearing protective headgear. This applies to passengers as well.

 

This Maine snowmobile information may not be the most current. For the latest registration, laws and rules, visit the Maine snowmobile information website of Maine's Department of Inland Fisheries & Wildlife.


SNOWMOBILE REGISTRATION

Snowmobiles may be registered in a number of different ways.  They may be registered through the mail, over the internet, or in person at over 200 locations throughout the State, including the Department's main office located at 284 State Street in Augusta.

Mail applications for snowmobile registrations to: Division of Licensing and Registration, Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, 41 State House Station, 284 State Street, Augusta, Maine  04333-0041; Tel: (207) 287-8000.

For a list of locations where they may be registered, call the Department's Information line at 207-287-8000.

To register over the internet using VISA or MasterCard, check out our online registration information.

The fees for registering are as follows:

Non-residents: $68 for season registration
$58 for a 10-consecutive day registration
$43 for a 3-consecutive day registration
Residents: $33 for season registration (July 1-June 30)

Prior to registering a snowmobile, the agent must collect sales or use taxes which are due.  (Non-residents are exempt from sales or use tax.)

Expanded Registration:  After March 31st, a registration covering the remainder of the registration period plus one additional year may be obtained by a resident for $40.50.

HIGHLIGHTS AND ITEMS OF INTEREST

  • Registration fees have increased by $3.00 for the upcoming snowmobile season and next year. This is a temporary increase and is only effective for the 03/04 and 04/05 registration periods.

  • Snowmobiles that are more than 25 years old may be registered by residents as antique snowmobiles. This registration authorizes that snowmobile to be operated for the purpose of traveling to, returning from and participating in an exhibition, parade or other event, or for occasional personal use.

  • Anyone in the business of renting or leasing out snowmobiles must register with the Department as a rental agent and purchase a certificate for $28. Agents are required to provide instruction and educational material to anyone renting or leasing a snowmobile.

  • Anyone who allows a person under 18 years of age to operate a snowmobile is liable (jointly with the minor's parent of guardian) for any damages caused in the operation of that snowmobile).

  • Reciprocity - There are no longer reciprocal privileges for snowmobile registrations. Maine law has been amended to require registration in this state by nonresident snowmobile owners.

  • Children must be 10 years of age or older to operate a snowmobile, unaccompanied by an adult, on land other than that owned by their parent or guardian and must be 14 years of age before crossing public ways.

  • Snowmobiles may not be operated in any cemetery, burial place or burying ground.

  • Any snowmobile accident resulting in injuries requiring the services of a physician or in death of a person, must be reported, by the quickest means of communication, to the nearest law enforcement officer.

  • Accidents involving only property damage to the estimated amount of $1,000 or more must be reported within 72 hours on forms provided by the department.

  • Imprudent operation is not limited to state maintained trails; it is now prohibited on any trail.

MAINE SNOWMOBILE LAW
Title 12 - Chapter 715
Subchapter II - Snowmobiles

7821. Definitions:

Unless a different meaning is plainly required for the purposes of this subchapter, the following words and terms shall have the following meanings.

1-A. "Antique snowmobile" means a snowmobile more than 25 years old that is registered as an antique snowmobile under section 7824, subsection 2-B.

1.  "Cowling" means the forward or rear portion of the vehicle, usually of fiberglass or similar material, surrounding the motor and clutch assembly.

2.  "Dwelling" means any building used as a permanent residence or place of domicile.

3.  "To Operate" in all its moods and tenses, when it refers to a snowmobile, means to use a snowmobile in any manner within the jurisdiction of the State, whether or not the vehicle is under way.

4.  "Owner" for the purposes of registration, means any person holding title to a snowmobile or having exclusive right to the use of a snowmobile for a period greater than 30 days.

5.  "Snowmobile" means any vehicle propelled by mechanical power that is primarily designed to travel over ice or snow supported in part by skis, belts or cleats.

7823. License

No operator's license is required for the operation of a snowmobile.

7824. Registration

2.  Fee. Except as provided in 2-B (antique snowmobiles), the annual snowmobile registration fee is as follows:

A. For residents, $33. The registration for a snowmobile owned by a resident is valid for one year, commencing on July 1st; and

 B. For nonresidents:

(1) $43 for a 3-consecutive day registration.

(2) $58 for a 10-consecutive day registration.

NOTE:  A person may purchase more than one 3-day or 10-day registration in any season.

(3) $68 for a seasonal registration.  The registration for a snowmobile owned by a nonresident must specify the dates for which the registration is valid.

2-A.  Servicemen permanently stationed in Maine. The following persons are eligible to register any snowmobile owned by them at the resident fee:

Any person serving in the Armed Forces of the United States who is permanently stationed at a military or naval post, station or base in the State; and the spouse and children of that person, provided they permanently reside with that person.

Certification from the commander (or designated agent) of his post, station or base, that the person mentioned in the certificate is permanently stationed at that post, station or base is required. 

Registration fees shall be allocated as if the person registering the snowmobile was a resident of the municipality in which the post, station or base is situated.

2-B.  Antique snowmobile registration fee.   A resident who owns a snowmobile that is more than 25 years old and that is substantially maintained in original or restored condition may register that snowmobile under this subsection as an antique snowmobile. An antique snowmobile registration authorizes that snowmobile to be operated only for the purpose of traveling to, returning from and participating in an exhibition, parade or other event of interest to the public, or for occasional personal use. The fee for an antique snowmobile registration is $33. An antique snowmobile registration is valid until the ownership of that antique snowmobile is transferred to another person. Upon the transfer of ownership, the new owner may reregister that snowmobile as an antique snowmobile by paying the $33 antique snowmobile registration fee. The registration fee for an antique snowmobile is allocated according to subsection 3, paragraph 

   A.  (NOTE: Snowmobiles registered under this section are not required to display the registration numbers).

3.  Allocation of Fees.    The Legislature shall appropriate to the department in each fiscal year an amount equal to the administrative costs incurred by the department in collecting revenue under this subsection. The department's administrative costs must be verified by the Department of Conservation and the Department of Administrative and Financial Services.

A. The registration fee for residents is credited as follows 

(1) Twenty-two percent is credited to the General Fund as undedicated revenue; 

(2) Fifty-two percent is credited to the Snowmobile Trail Fund of the Department of Conservation, Bureau of Parks and Lands and;

(3) Twenty-six percent is annually distributed to the municipality of the owner's residence as shown on the owners registration certificate, except that in unorganized territory, 26% is annually distributed to the county of the owner's residence as shown on the owner's registration certificate.

B. The registration fee for nonresidents is credited as follows:

(1) Eighteen percent is credited to the General Fund as undedicated revenue and; 

(1-A) Seven percent is credited to the Snowmobile Enforcement Fund established under section 7824-G.

(2) The remainder is credited to the Snowmobile Trail Fund of the Department of Conservation, Bureau of Parks and Lands.

C. All other money received under this subchapter, including dealer license fees, is credited to the General Fund as undedicated revenue.

D. The annual fee for each dealer number plate is credited as follows:

(1) Thirty percent is credited to the General Fund as undedicated revenue; and 

(2) Seventy percent is credited to the Snowmobile Trail Fund of the Bureau of Parks and Lands.

E. All other money received under this chapter, including dealer license fees, is credited to the General Fund as undedicated revenue.

4.  Use of fees.

B. The Bureau of Parks & Lands is authorized to use moneys credited to the Snowmobile Trail Fund to make grants-in-aid to political subdivisions, educational institutions, regional planning agencies, snowmobile groups and others for the construction and maintenance of snowmobile trails and for research development and planning of snowmobile trails.

(1) For all grants to be disbursed, the bureau shall promulgate rules specifying how to apply for the grants, which projects are eligible and the formula for state support.

(2) The bureau may charge a reasonable fee for these services and materials when the moneys credited to it under this paragraph are insufficient to satisfy the demand for the services and materials.  All fees so collected shall be deposited in the Snowmobile Trail Fund of the Bureau of  Parks and Lands.

(3) If any of these moneys are not expended during the year in which they are collected, the unexpended balance shall not lapse, but shall be carried as a continuing account available for the purposes specified until expended.

C. The Bureau of Parks and Lands is authorized to use moneys credited to the Snowmobile Trail fund for snowmobile trail acquisition, including, but not limited to, the purchase or lease of real estate and the acquisition of easements, construction, development, planning and maintenance and for providing educational and informational materials for the use of operators of snowmobiles and for research.

D. The moneys distributed to the municipalities by the department may be appropriated by the municipalities for any purpose for which they may lawfully appropriate moneys.

E. The moneys distributed to the counties by the department may be appropriated by the counties for use in the unorganized townships where the fee was payable.

6.  Duplicate registration certificate.  The holder of any resident or nonresident seasonal registration certificate issued under this section may obtain a duplicate from the commissioner for a fee of $4.

7.  Numbers permanent.   All numbers once awarded under this section to a resident-owned snowmobile remain with that snowmobile until the snowmobile is destroyed, abandoned or permanently removed from this State, except that numbers that have been inactive for at least 7 years may be reissued.

8.  Transfer of ownership or discontinuance of use.

A.  A person who transfers the ownership or permanently discontinues the use of a snowmobile having a resident registration or a nonresident seasonal registration and applies for registration of another snowmobile in the same registration year is entitled to a registration upon payment of a transfer fee of $5, and is not required to pay the regular registration fee.

B. Whenever ownership is transferred or the use of a snowmobile for which a registration has already been issued is discontinued, the old registration shall be properly signed and executed by the owner showing that the ownership of the snowmobile has been transferred or its use discontinued and returned to the commissioner within 10 days of the transfer or discontinuance of use.

C. If there is a change of ownership of a snowmobile for which a registration number has previously been issued, the new owner shall apply for a new registration, shall set forth the particular snowmobile involved.

9.  Reciprocity.  Except as specifically provided in this subsection, and notwithstanding any other provision of law, a snowmobile belonging to a nonresident may be possessed or operated in this State as long as the snowmobile is properly registered in this state in the name of a nonresident owner of the snowmobile. A snowmobile owned by a nonresident may not be issued a resident registration. Nothing in this subsection authorizes the operation of any snowmobile in any manner contrary to this subchapter. This subsection does not apply to snowmobiles and grooming equipment registered to a federal or state entity, snowmobile clubs, municipalities or counties from bordering states or provinces engaged in trail grooming. Snowmobiles registered in either New Hampshire or Canada may be operated on any lake or pond that is both partly in the State and New Hampshire or Canada without being registered in the State.

10.  Restrictions.

A. The registration certificate shall be subject to inspection by any law enforcement officer on demand.

B. The registration number assigned to a snowmobile shall be displayed in such form and manner as the commissioner may determine except that an antique snowmobile is not required to display registration numbers.

C. The registrant shall notify the commissioner if a snowmobile is destroyed, abandoned or permanently removed from this State.

11.  Open snowmobile weekend.   The commissioner may designate one weekend a year as an open snowmobile weekend when snowmobiles registered outside the State may be used in the State without being registered in the State. All other provisions of this chapter relating to snowmobiles apply during an open snowmobile weekend.

7824-A. Collection by Commissioner

The commissioner or agents of the commissioner shall act on behalf of the State Tax Assessor to collect, at the time and place of registration, the use tax due under Title 36, chapters 211 to 225, in respect to any snowmobile for which an original registration (any registration other than a renewal by the same owner) is required under this Title.

All taxes collected must be transmitted to the Treasurer of State and must be credited to the General Fund as undedicated revenue. The Legislature shall appropriate to the department in each fiscal year an amount equal to the administrative costs incurred by the department in collecting revenue under this subsection. The department s administrative costs must be verified by the Department of Administrative and Financial Services.

7824-E. Collection by State Tax Assessor

Nothing in sections 7824-A, 7824-B, and 7824-F precludes the State Tax Assessor from collecting the tax due in respect to any snowmobile under Title 36.

7824-F. Payment of tax prior to registration 

Prior to registering a snowmobile, an agent of the commissioner shall collect sales or use taxes due. Sales or use taxes are due unless:

1. Nonresident. The person registering the snowmobile is not a resident of this State.  Nonresidents are exempt from sales or use taxes on snowmobiles under Title 36, 1760, sub-25-B.

2. Renewal. The registration is a renewal registration by the same owner.

3. Collected by the dealer. The applicant possesses a dealer's certificate showing that the sales tax was collected by the dealer. The State Tax Assessor shall prescribe the form of a dealer's certificate; or

4. Exempt. The snowmobile is otherwise exempt from sales or use taxes under the provisions of Title 36, 1760, sub25-B (purchased by a person who is not a resident of this State).

7824-G. Snowmobile Enforcement Fund

The Snowmobile Enforcement Fund is established in the Bureau of Warden Service. Money in the fund may be used only to supplement other funds appropriated to the enforcement operations program. Money in the fund at the end of each fiscal year does not lapse and must be carried forward to the next fiscal year. The Colonel may use money in the fund only for the following purposes.

1. Regular or overtime personnel services costs of the Warden Service related to enforcement of snowmobile laws;

2. Safety or other education programs conducted by the Department or authorized by the department that are related to the operation of snowmobiles; or 

3. Other purposes, including the purchase of equipment or machinery, determined by the Colonel as necessary for effective snowmobile safety and enforcement activities.

7825. Dealer's registration and license. 

1. Application and issuance. Any person who is in the business of selling snowmobiles in the State shall register as a dealer and secure a dealer's license from the commissioner.  Dealers so registered and licensed need not register individual snowmobiles. "New snowmobile" means one that has not been registered in this State or any other state or for which sales tax has not been paid in this state or any other state that taxes the purchase of a new snowmobile.

2. Fees. The dealer's registration and license fee shall be $18 annually from each July 1st.

3. Dealer's number plates. Dealer's plates shall be provided and obtained as follows:

A. Each registered dealer may receive dealer's number plates. The annual fee for a dealer's number plate is:

(1) For a resident dealer s plate, $19; and

(2) For a nonresident dealer s plate, $63.

a. Replacement of lost or stolen plates may be obtained for a fee of $8 for each plate.

C. If a number plate is lost or stolen the owner shall notify the commissioner immediately. 

4. Temporary registrations and numbers.   The commissioner may issue temporary numbers and registrations to bonafide dealers who may, upon the sale or exchange of a snowmobile, issue them to new owners in order to allow them to operate snowmobiles for a period of 20 consecutive days only after the day of sale in lieu of a permanent number as required by this subchapter.

5. Restrictions.   Dealers shall display their dealer s number on each snowmobile being used until the sale of the snowmobile, whereupon it becomes the owner s responsibility to register the snowmobile.

7825-A. Snowmobile repair shop registration and license

1. A person whose business includes repairing snowmobiles but who is not required to be licensed as a snowmobile dealer under 7825 may register that business entity as a snowmobile repair shop and secure a snowmobile repair shop license and number plate from the commissioner.

2. The annual fee for a snowmobile repair shop license is $18.

3. The owner of a snowmobile repair shop licensed under this section may operate or allow the operation of an unregistered snowmobile for the purpose of field testing repairs to that snowmobile if valid repair shop number plates issued under this section are affixed to the snowmobile during the field test; and the snowmobile is not owned by the repair shop or any person employed by the repair shop.  Operating an unregistered snowmobile in compliance with this subsection is not a violation of section 7827, subsection 1.

7825-B.  Snowmobile Rental Agent Certificate

1. Registration and issuance.  Except as provided in this section, a person or business may not rent or lease a snowmobile unless that person or business:

A. Registers with the department as a snowmobile rental agent and is issued a snowmobile rental agent certificate;

B. Obtains a Maine certificate of number for each snowmobile being offered for rent or lease in the name of the person or business holding that certificate; and

C. Instructs each person who rents or leases a snowmobile how to operate the snowmobile, including how to use the brake, throttle and kill switch, and provides to that person a pamphlet describing proper hand signals.

2. Fee. The fee for a snowmobile rental agent certificate is $28 and is valid from July 1st to June 30th.

3. Exception. This section does not apply to a person lawfully engaged in guiding activities under 7311 who accompanies others on guided trips that include the use of snowmobiles, except that those persons must provide those operators of snowmobiles with instructions equivalent to those described in subsection 1, paragraph C.

7826. Operating on land of another

1. No permission given.  This subchapter is in no way to be construed as giving license or permission to cross or go on the property of another.

2. Stop and identify requirement.  Any person operating a snowmobile upon the land of another shall stop and identify himself upon the request of the landowner or his duly authorized representative. Any person in violation shall be held accountable to the owner under existing law.

7827. Prohibited acts

1.  Operating unregistered snowmobile.  A person is guilty, except as provided in sub-23, paragraphs A and B. of operating an unregistered snowmobile if he operates a snowmobile which is not registered in accordance with 7824.

2. Operating a snowmobile upon a controlled access highway.  A person is guilty, except as provided in sub-23, paragraph C, of operating a snowmobile upon a controlled access highway if he operates a snowmobile upon a controlled access highway or within the right-of-way limits of a controlled access highway.

3. Unlawfully operating a snowmobile on a plowed road.  A person is guilty of unlawfully operating a snowmobile on a plowed road if he operates a snowmobile upon any plowed private road, or public road plowed privately without public compensation, after having been forbidden to do so by the owner thereof, the owner's agent or municipal officer, either personally or by appropriate notices posted conspicuously on that road. 

4. Operating a snowmobile on a public way.  A person is guilty, except as provided in sub-23, paragraph D, of operating a snowmobile on a public way if he operates a snowmobile upon the main traveled portion, the sidewalks or the plowed snow banks of a public way.

4-A. Unlawfully operating a vehicle on a snowmobile trail.  A person is guilty of unlawfully operating a vehicle on a snowmobile trail if that person operates any 4-wheel drive vehicle, dune buggy, ATV, motorcycle or any other motor vehicle, other than a snowmobile and appurtenant equipment (at any time) on snowmobile trails which are financed in whole or in part with funds from the Snowmobile Trail Fund, unless that use has been authorized by the landowner or the landowner's agent, or unless the use is necessitated by an emergency involving safety of persons or property.

5. Failing to stop a snowmobile before entering a public way.  A person is guilty of failing to stop a snowmobile before entering a public way or a private way maintained for travel if that person fails to bring a snowmobile to a complete stop before entering a public way or private way maintained for travel, i.e. driveway .

6. Failing to yield right-of-way while operating a snowmobile.  A person is guilty of failing to yield the right-of-way while operating a snowmobile if that person fails to yield the right-of-way to all vehicular traffic while operating a snowmobile on a public way or a private way maintained for travel, i.e. driveway.

7. Crossing a closed bridge, culvert, overpass or underpass with a snowmobile.  A person is guilty of crossing a closed bridge, culvert, overpass or underpass with a snowmobile if he crosses with a snowmobile a bridge, culvert, overpass or underpass closed to snowmobiles by the Commissioner of Transportation. The Commissioner of Transportation may, following a public hearing, prohibit the crossing of an individual bridge, culvert, overpass or underpass if he determines that that crossing or use of the public way is hazardous. Any bridge, culvert, overpass or underpass closed by the Commissioner of Transportation must be posted by appropriate notices.

8. Reckless operation of snowmobile.  A person is guilty of reckless operation of a snowmobile if he operates any snowmobile in such a way as to recklessly create a substantial risk of serious bodily injury to another person.

9. Operating a snowmobile under the influence of intoxicating liquor or drugs.  A person commits the crime of operating a snowmobile while under the influence of intoxicating liquor or drugs if that person operates or attempts to operate any snowmobile:

A. While under the influence of intoxicating liquor or drugs or a combination of liquor and drugs; or 

B. For a person 21 years of age or older, while having 0.08% or more by weight of alcohol in that person's blood; or 

C. For a person less than 21 years of age, while having any amount of alcohol in the blood.

Operating a snowmobile while under the influence of intoxicating liquor or drugs is a Class D crime.

9-A. Failure to comply with duty to submit.  A person is guilty of failure to comply with the duty to submit to and complete a blood-alcohol or drug concentration test under 7828 if that person refuses to submit to or fails to complete a blood-alcohol or drug concentration test or both when requested to do so by a law enforcement officer who has probable cause to believe that the person operated or attempted to operate a snowmobile while under the influence of intoxicating liquor.

10. Operating a snowmobile to endanger.  A person is guilty of operating a snowmobile to endanger if he operates any snowmobile so as to endanger any person or property as follows: 

A.  A person may not operate a snowmobile [on any trail] except at a reasonable and prudent speed for the existing conditions, including when approaching and crossing an intersection or railway grade crossing, when approaching and taking a curve, when approaching a hill crest, when traveling upon any narrow or winding trail and when a special hazard exists with respect to pedestrians, skiers or other traffic by reason of weather or trail conditions.

B.  Speed must be controlled at all times as necessary to avoid colliding with any person, vehicle, snowmobile or other object on or adjacent to the snowmobile trail.

11. Operating a snowmobile at greater than reasonable and prudent speed.  A person is guilty of operating a snowmobile at greater than a reasonable and prudent speed if he operates any snowmobile except at a reasonable and prudent speed for the existing conditions [on any trail].

12. Unlawfully operating a snowmobile while underage. A person is guilty of unlawfully operating a snowmobile while under age if he is under the age of 14 years and operates a snowmobile across any public way maintained for travel.

13. Permitting an unaccompanied child to operate a snowmobile.  A person is guilty, except as provided in sub-23, paragraph E, of permitting an unaccompanied child to operate a snowmobile if he permits a child under 10 years of age to operate any snowmobile unless accompanied by an adult (within visual and voice contact and under the effective control of a child's parent or guardian or another person 21 years of age or older).

13-A. Headgear required.  A person operating a snowmobile on a snowmobile trail identified by the Department of Conservation, Bureau of Parks and Lands as having been funded by the Snowmobile Trail Fund pursuant to section 7824, subsection 4, may not:

A.  If the person is under 18 years of age, fail to wear protective headgear that conforms to the standards established under Title 29-A, section 3: or

B.  If carrying a passenger under 18 years of age on the snowmobile unless the passenger is wearing protective headgear that conforms to the standards established under Title 29-A, section 2038, subsection 3.

A person who violates this subsection commits a civil violation for which a fine of not less than $100 nor more than $500 may be adjudged.

The Department of Conservation,  Bureau of Parks and Lands shall develop an administratively simple means of identifying trails that have been funded by the Snowmobile Trail Fund so that snowmobile riders can readily determine to what trails this subsection applies.

14. Operating a snowmobile which exceeds noise limit.  A person is guilty, except as provided in sub-23, paragraphs A and F, of operating a snowmobile which exceeds the noise limit if he operates a snowmobile above the following noise limits.

A. Every snowmobile manufactured after 10/1/73, and offered for sale or sold in this State shall be constructed to limit the total vehicle noise to  not more than 82 decibels of sound pressure level at 50 feet on the A scale, as measured by the SAE standards J-192.

B. Every snowmobile manufactured after 2/1/75, and offered for sale or sold in this State shall be constructed to limit total vehicle noise to not more than 78 decibels of sound pressure level at 50 feet on the A scale, as measured by the SAE standards J-192.

15. Unlawfully modifying snowmobile.  A person is guilty, except as provided in sub-23, paragraph A, of unlawfully modifying a snowmobile if he modifies any snowmobile in a manner that amplifies or otherwise increases total noise emission above that emitted by the snowmobile as originally constructed, regardless of the date of the manufacture.

16. Operating a snowmobile with insufficient lights.  A person is guilty, except as provided in sub-23, paragraph A, of operating a snowmobile with insufficient lights if he operates a snowmobile which is not equipped as follows:

A. Every snowmobile shall have mounted on the front at least one headlight capable of casting a white beam for a distance of at least 100 feet directly ahead of the snowmobile; and

B. Every snowmobile shall have mounted on the rear at least one lamp capable of displaying a red light which shall be visible at a distance of at least 100 feet behind the snowmobile.

17. Failure to use snowmobile lights.  A person is guilty, except as provided in sub-23, paragraph A, of failure to use snowmobile lights if he fails to use the lights required under sub-16 as follows:

A.  During the period from 1/2 hour after sunset to 1/2 hour before sunrise; and

B.  At any time when, due to insufficient light or unfavorable atmospheric conditions caused by fog or otherwise, other persons, vehicles and other objects are not clearly discernible for a distance of 500 feet ahead.

18.Operating a snowmobile on railroad tracks.  A person is guilty, except as provided in sub-23, paragraph F-1, of unlawfully operating a snowmobile on railroad tracks, if that person:

A. Operates any snowmobile along or adjacent and parallel to the tracks of any railroad within the limits of any railroad right-of-way without written permission from the railroad owning the right-of-way; or

B. Operates any snowmobile across the tracks of any railroad after having been forbidden to do so by the railroad owning the railroad right-of-way, or by an agent of that railroad, either personally or by appropriate notices posted conspicuously along the railroad right-of-way.

19. Operating a snowmobile in a cemetery.  A person is guilty of operating a snowmobile in a cemetery if he operates any snowmobile in any cemetery, burial place or burying ground.

20. Operating too close to certain buildings.  A person is guilty, except as provided in sub-23, paragraph G, of operating too close to a dwelling, hospital, nursing home, convalescent home or church if he operates a snowmobile within 200 feet of any of those buildings.

20-A. Abuse of another person's property.  A person is guilty of abuse of another persons property if, while operating a snowmobile, that person tears down or destroys a fence or wall on another person's land, leaves open a gate or bars on another person's land or tramples or destroys crops on another person's land.

21. Unlawfully permitting operation.  A person is guilty of unlawfully permitting operation of a snowmobile if that person owns a snowmobile that is operated by another person in violation of any section of this subchapter.  A person is guilty of unlawfully permitting operation of a snowmobile if that person is the parent or guardian responsible for the care of a minor under 18 years of age who operates a snowmobile in violation of this subchapter.

22. Failure to report accident.  A person is guilty of failure to report a snowmobile accident if that person:

A. Is the operator of any snowmobile involved in any accident resulting in injuries requiring the services of a physician, in death of any person; some person acting for such an operator; or the owner of the involved snowmobile having knowledge of the accident, should the operator of the snowmobile be unknown; and

B. Fails to give notice of the accident, by the quickest means, to a law enforcement officer available nearest to the place where the accident occurred.

Accidents involving only property damage to the estimated amount of $1,000 or more must be reported within 72 hours on accident report forms provided by the department.

Failure to give notice of certain snowmobile accidents under 7827, sub-22 to the nearest available law enforcement officer to the place where the accident occurred shall be prima facie evidence that the accident was not reported.   (12 MRSA Section 7952).

Use of accident reports. All accident reports made by investigating officers shall be for the purpose of statistical analysis and accident prevention and shall not be admissible in evidence in any trail, civil or criminal, arising out of the accident, but any investigating agency may disclose, upon the request of any person, the date, time and location of the accident and the names and addresses of drivers, owners, injured persons, witnesses and the investigating officer.  The investigating agency may upon written request furnish a photocopy of any report at the expense of the person making the request.  (12 MRSA Section 7952).

22-A.  Operating snowmobile on open water.  A person is guilty of operating a snowmobile on open water if that person operates or attempts to operate a snowmobile on open water.  For purposes of this subsection, "open water" means any area of an inland water body that is free of ice and snow.  This subsection does not apply to private  ponds.  Notwithstanding Title 17, section 2267-A, subsection 3, the owner or operator of a snowmobile that has been submerged or partially submerged as a result of a violation of this subsection shall remove the snowmobile within 24 hours of its submersion. The owner or operator of a snowmobile submerged or partially submerged as a result of a violation of this subsection shall pay any damages resulting from the submersion or removal.  If the owner or operator of a snowmobile submerged or partially submerged as a result of a violation of this subsection fails to remove the snowmobile within 24 hours of its submersion, the commissioner may remove the snowmobile at the expense of the owner or operator or request in writing that the court direct the owner or operator to remove the snowmobile immediately.

23. Exceptions.

A. Notwithstanding subsections 1, 14, 15, 16 and 17, snowmobiles operated at a prearranged racing meet whose sponsor has obtained a permit to hold such a meet from the commissioner are exempt from the provisions of this subchapter concerning registration, noise, horsepower, and lights during the time of operation at such meets and at all pre-race practice at the location of the meet.

B. Notwithstanding the provisions of sub-1:   

(1) No registration shall be required for a snowmobile operated over the snow on land on which the owner lives or is domiciled, provided the snowmobile is not operated elsewhere within the jurisdiction of this State,

(2) No registration shall be required for a snowmobile operated by a commercial ski area for the purpose of packing snow or for rescue operation thereon, unless the snowmobile is required to cross a  public way during that operation; and

(3) Snowmobiles owned and operated in this State by the Federal Government, the State or political subdivision of the State shall be exempt from registration fees, but shall be registered and required to display numbers.

(4) Registration is not required to field test repairs to a snowmobile if valid snowmobile repair shop number plates issued under section 7825-A are affixed to the snowmobile during the field test and the snowmobile is not owned by the snowmobile repair shop or any repair shop employee; and

(5) Registration is not required to field test repairs to a snowmobile if the snowmobile is tested on the premises of the repair shop when the snowmobile repair shop is open and the snowmobile is not owned by the snowmobile repair shop or any repair shop employee.

C. Notwithstanding the provisions of sub-2:

(1) Properly registered snowmobiles may cross controlled access highways by use of bridges over or roads under those highways, or by use of roads crossing controlled access highways at grade;  and

(2) The Commissioner of Transportation may issue special permits for designated crossings of controlled access highways.

D. Notwithstanding the provisions of sub-4:

(1) Properly registered snowmobiles may operate on a public way only the distance necessary, but in no case to exceed 300 yards on the extreme right of the traveled way for the purpose of crossing, as directly as possible, a public way, sidewalk or culvert;

(2) Properly registered snowmobiles may operate on a public way only the distance necessary, but in no case to exceed 500 yards on the extreme right of the traveled way for the sole purpose of crossing, as directly as possible, a bridge, overpass or underpass, provided that the operation can be made in safety and that it does not interfere with vehicular traffic approaching from either direction on the public way;

(3) Snowmobiles may operate on any portion of public ways when the public way has been closed in accordance with Title 23, 2953;

(4) If the main traveled portion of a public way is publicly plowed and utilized by conventional motor vehicles, snowmobiles may operate only on that portion of the way not maintained or utilized for the operation of conventional motor vehicles, except that operation on the left side of the way is prohibited during the hours from sunset to sunrise on the portion of the way not maintained or utilized for the operation of conventional motor vehicles. This subparagraph does not apply to a snowmobile operated by a public utility regulated by the Public Utilities Commission while being operated in the course of the utility's corporate function, so that public utilities may effectively and speedily carry out their obligations to the public.

(5) Snowmobiles may be operated on streets and public ways during a period of emergency when the emergency has been so declared by a police agency having jurisdiction and when travel by conventional motor vehicles is not practicable. This subparagraph shall not apply to a snowmobile operated by a public utility regulated by the Public Utilities Commission while being operated in the course of the utilities corporate function, so that public utilities may effectively and speedily carry out their obligations to the public; and

(6) Snowmobiles may be operated on streets and public ways in special snowmobile events of limited duration conducted according to a prearranged schedule, under a permit from the governmental unit having jurisdiction.

(7) Notwithstanding subparagraphs (1) to (6), snowmobiles may be operated on the extreme right of a public way within the built-up portion of a municipality, unorganized or unincorporated township if the appropriate governmental unit has designated the public way as a snowmobile access route for the purpose of allowing snowmobiles access to places of business. A public way designated by an appropriate governmental unit as a snowmobile-access route must be posted conspicuously at regular intervals by that governmental unit with highly visible signs designating the snowmobile-access route. Before designating a public way as a snowmobile-access route, the appropriate governmental unit shall make appropriate determinations that snowmobile travel on the extreme right of the public way may be conducted safely and will not interfere with vehicular traffic on the public way. For purposes of this subparagraph, "appropriate governmental unit" means the Dept. of  Transportation, county commissioners or municipal officers within their respective jurisdictions. The jurisdiction of each appropriate governmental unit over public ways pursuant to this subparagraph is the same as its jurisdiction over the passage of vehicles on public ways  pursuant to Title 29 902. Municipal or county law enforcement officials having jurisdiction have primary enforcement authority over any route established under this paragraph.

E. Notwithstanding sub-13, that subsection does not apply on land which is owned by the parent or guardian or on land where permission for use has been granted to the parent or guardian.

F. Notwithstanding sub-14:

(1) Snowmobiles manufactured on or before 10/1/73 may be operated without reference to that subsection, unless they have been modified in violation of sub-15; and

(2) Snowmobiles manufactured after 10/1/73, but on or before 2/1/75, may be operated without reference to the requirements of that subsection concerning the noise limit of  78 decibels of sound pressure.

F-1. Notwithstanding sub-18: a person is not guilty of operating a snowmobile on railroad tracks if he is operating within the right-of-way of a portion of railroad line which has been officially abandoned under the authority of the Interstate Commerce Commission.

G. Notwithstanding sub-20, that subsection does not apply in the following situations:

(1) When operating on public ways in accordance with sub-4, 5, 6 and 7 and sub-23, 
paragraph C;

(2) When operating on the frozen surface of any body of water; and 

(3) When operating on land which the operator owns or is permitted to use.

24. Unlawful issuance of snowmobile registration.  An agent is guilty of unlawfully issuing a snowmobile registration if that agent issues a resident snowmobile registration to a nonresident or a nonresident snowmobile registration to a resident.

25. Fraudulent acquisition of a snowmobile registration. A person is guilty of fraudulently obtaining a snowmobile registration if that person obtains that registration through fraud, misstatement or misrepresentation.

26. Unlawfully renting or leasing a snowmobile.  A person is guilty of unlawfully renting or leasing a snowmobile if that person rents or leases a snowmobile in violation of section 7825-B.

7828. Implied consent to chemical tests

Any person who operates or attempts to operate a snowmobile within this State has a duty to submit to a test to determine that person's blood-alcohol level or drug concentration by analysis of blood, breath or urine if there is probable cause to believe that the person has operated or attempted to operate a snowmobile while under the influence of intoxicating liquor or drugs. The duty to submit to a blood alcohol or drug concentration test includes the duty to complete either a blood, breath or urine test or any combination of those tests. Tests and procedures applicable in determining whether a person is under the influence of intoxicating liquor or drugs are governed by 7912.

7829. Liability for damage by other persons.

The owner of a snowmobile, the person who gives or furnishes that snowmobile to a person under 18 years of age and the parent or guardian responsible for the care of that minor are jointly and severally liable with the minor for any damages caused in the operation of the snowmobile by that minor. 

7830. Impoundment of snowmobiles.

When a law enforcement officer issues a summons for a violation under this subchapter, the officer may impound the snowmobile operated by the person who receives the summons if, in the judgment of the officer, based on actual previous offenses by the operator or other considerations, the operator will continue to operate the machine in violation of this subchapter and that operation may be a hazard to the safety of persons or property. 

The operator or owner of an impounded snowmobile may reclaim the snowmobile at any time subsequent to 24 hours after the issuance of the summons upon payment of the costs of impoundment to the enforcement agency impounding the snowmobile.

In addition to the snowmobile law, the following provisions apply to snowmobiles and are found elsewhere in the Inland Fisheries & Wildlife laws:

7035. Powers

The commissioner may adopt, amend and repeal reasonable rules, including emergency rules, necessary for the proper administration, implementation, enforcement and interpretation of any provision of law that he is charged with the duty of administering. These rules duly promulgated shall have the full force and effect of law and shall be effective upon filing with the Secretary of State, unless a later date is required by statute or specified in the rule.

No municipality or political subdivision of the State shall enact any ordinance, law or rule regulating the operation, registration or numbering of snowmobiles, or any other matter of chapter 715, subchapters I and II.

7053 Game Warden's Duties and Powers

In addition to other powers granted in chapters 701 to 721, game wardens may: Stop and examine any snowmobile to ascertain whether it is being operated in compliance with chapter 715, subchapter 11; demand and inspect the operator's certificate of registration; and examine the identification numbers of the snowmobile and any marks on it.

7056.  Officials with certain powers and duties of game wardens

Snowmobile laws.  All law enforcement personnel of the State, including those of the Bureau of Forestry and supervisors and rangers of the State Bureau of Parks and Lands and Allagash Wilderness Waterway shall have the same powers and duties as game wardens to enforce chapter 715, subchapter 11.

7060. Failure to stop for a law enforcement officer.

A person is guilty of failure to stop for a law enforcement officer if he fails or refuses to stop any snowmobile on request or signal of any law enforcement officer in uniform whose duty it is to enforce chapter 715, subchapter 11.

7901-A.  Penalties. 

Violation of a prohibited act in chapter 715 is a civil violation, except for the following criminal violations: Reckless operation of a snowmobile (7827, sub-8); operating under the influence (7827, sub-9); operating to endanger (7827, sub-10); operating at greater than reasonable/prudent speed (7827, sub-11); unlawful issuance/fraudulent acquisition of a snowmobile registration (7827, sub-24 & 25).

7910. Collection and disposition of money.

Moneys relating to snowmobile laws and rules shall be collected and expended in accordance with 7824, subsections 3-4.

The Commissioner of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife has adopted the following regulations pertaining to snowmobiles in the State of Maine.

Chapter (9.02). Displaying registration number and validation stickers

Resident Snowmobile.  The resident registration number and suffix letter (when applicable) shall be painted or firmly attached to both sides of the cowling of each snowmobile in a color that is in marked and distinct contrast to the background to which the number is applied. The registration number and suffix letter must read from left to right with block character Arabic numbers and capital letter not less than one inch in height.

Validation stickers issued by the Department shall be placed within 3 inches of the assigned registration number on both sides of the cowling of the snowmobile. The letter ME before the registration number need not be displayed. Duplicates for destroyed or lost stickers may be obtained for a fee of $1.00 per set.

Non-Resident Snowmobile. The nonresident snowmobile registration number will be printed on the registration stickers issued by the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife. The registration stickers must be attached to both sides of the cowling of the snowmobile. Only the most current set of registration stickers will be displayed on the snowmobile.

9.04. Noise Limitations

Pursuant to the provisions of Title 12 M.R.S.A. 7827 (14), no snowmobile manufactured after February 1,1975 may be sold or offered for sale by any manufacturer, distributor or dealer in the State of Maine unless such snowmobile is constructed so as to limit total vehicle noise to not more than 78 decibels of sound pressure at 50 feet on the A scale as measured by the SAE Standards J-192a and proof of compliance with the foregoing requirement in the form of either (i) an SSCC label conspicuously attached showing certification by the Snowmobile Safety Certification Committee, Inc. that such snowmobile meets the State's minimum noise standards or (ii) by a letter with test results submitted to the Commissioner of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife showing an evaluation of the noise level by a competent independent testing laboratory certifying that such snowmobile meets the State's minimum noise standards.

9.06. Dealer Temporary Registration

Dealers may issue temporary registrations to new owners by completing the form provided by the Commissioner. The dealer must pay a fee of $1 for each temporary registration received from the Commissioner. The new owner may be charged no more than $1 for issuing the temporary registration.

9.07 Local Temporary Snowmobile Registration

Any snowmobile registration processed by a local registration agent which is not a renewal shall be a 90 day temporary registration. All snowmobiles covered by a local temporary snowmobile registration shall be required to display the snowmobile temporary registration sticker on each side of the cowling until the permanent registration is issued.

Chapter 11 - Protection & Safety of Spectators At Snowmobile Races

Relating to safety of spectators during snowmobile racing, a permit must be obtained from the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, Warden Service, before a snowmobile race is conducted. Specifications of safety standards may be obtained from the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife.
Statutory Authority: 12 M.R.S.A. 7035, 7824

ALWAYS SEEK PERMISSION before engaging in any form of outdoor recreation on property which belongs to someone else. If you know you are welcome to use someone's land, don't abuse the privilege. If you don t know if you are welcome, find out. If the land is posted, or you know you are not welcome, find another location.

The Inland Fisheries & Wildlife Landowner Relations Program is aggressively working towards enhancing the relationship between land owners and land users. With approximately 94% of the land in Maine being privately owned, everyone MUST respect all landowners and their rights as landowners. All landowner wishes have to be followed by all outdoor recreational participants to help ensure access and use of private property in the years to come.

The Maine Legislature has enacted several laws that address the concerns of landowners. Summarized below are several of those laws and a brief description of each.

Landowner Liability  

(14 MRSA 159-A) Limited Duty.
  An owner, lessee, manager, holder or an easement or occupant of premises shall owe no duty of care to keep the premises safe for entry or use by others for recreational or harvesting activities or to give warning of any hazardous condition, use, structure or activity on these premises to persons entering for those purposes.  This subsection applies regardless of whether permission has been given to another to pursue recreational or harvesting activities on the premises.

Exceptions to Limited Duty.  1) For a willful or malicious failure to guard or warn against a dangerous condition, use, structure or  activity; and 2) when financial consideration is paid for the exclusive right to make use of the property for recreational activities.

Costs and fees.   The court shall award any direct legal costs, including reasonable attorney's fees, to an owner, lessee, manager, holder of an easement or occupant who is found not to be liable for injury to a person or property pursuant to this section.

Posting of Land (17-A MRSA, 402):  

Posting may be done in one of the following four ways:

  • By posting in a prominent place one or more qualifying signs that by words or symbols set forth the nature of the prohibition. These signs need not be placed at 100 yard intervals.
  • Use of signs placed no further than 100 feet apart that deny access for a particular activity or for all activities.
  • Paint system utilizing two silver horizontal paint marks placed on trees, rocks, fence posts or other objects (placed no further apart than 100 feet) now mean access by permission only.
  • Landowners may post their land "in a manner reasonably likely to come to the attention of the intruder."
  • Landowners may verbally or in writing convey to others to stay off their property.

Other provisions of posting.

  • Signs or paint markings must be at all vehicular access entrances from a public way.
  • It is unlawful to post the land of another and to remove, destroy, mutilate or deface any signs or paint marks.
  • Trespass by a motor vehicle is a violation of the trespass law.

Damage to Another's Property (14 MRSA, 7551-B):  

Any person who intentionally enters the land of another without permission and causes damage to property is liable to the owner in a civil action if the person: damages or throws down any fence, bar or gate; leaves a gate open; breaks glass; damages any road, drainage ditch,  culvert, bridge, sign or paint marking; or does other damage to any structure on property not that person's own or throws, drops, deposits, discards, dumps or otherwise disposes of litter, as defined in Title 17, section 2263, subsection 2, in any manner or amount, on property not that persons own. 

If the damage is intentional the person doing the damage is liable to the owner for 2 times the actual damage plus additional costs which includes the attorney fees of the landowner, costs and the value of the owner's time spent on involvement in an enforcement proceeding; if the damage is not caused intentionally, the person is liable to the owner for the actual damages plus the costs described above.

Unlawful cutting of trees (14 MRSA 7552 and 17 MRSA, 2510):   

It is unlawful for any person to intentionally, knowingly, recklessly or negligently cut down or fell any tree without the consent of the owner of the property on which the tree stands.

Operating on land of another (12 MRSA 7826):

Any person operating a snowmobile upon the land of another shall stop and identify himself upon the request of the landowner or his duly authorized representative. Any person in violation shall be held accountable to the owner under existing law.

For information on other provisions of these laws, call Maine Inland Fisheries & Wildlife's Landowner Coordinator at 287-8091.


CANADIAN BORDER CROSSING NOTES

1) You must stop at customs to cross a Canadian/U.S. border. The penalty for not stopping is $5,000 and loss of your snowmobile.

2) You must have a Trail Pass to ride Quebec and New Brunswick trails. In Quebec pick up your pass from the first club or the Federation of Clubs for Snowmobiles; telephone: (514) 252-3076.  In New Brunswick pick up your pass from the first New Brunswick Federation of Snowmobile Clubs (NBFSC) checkpoint (on the trail) or arrange to purchase from the NBFSC, telephone: (506) 325-2625; Fax: (506) 325-2627.

3) Trail 89/75 (Jackman) and Trail 85/19 (Fort Kent) crossing is open 24 hours/ 7 days a week.

4) Trail 92/95 crossing is only open:

Day

U.S. Time

Canadian Time

Mon. 6:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Tues 6:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Wed. 6:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m
Thurs.   6:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m
Fri. 6:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Sat . Closed     Closed
Sun. Closed Closed


5) Major ME/NB crossings are all open 24 hours/7 days a week. For local information contact: Ross Antworth,  New Brunswick Federation of Snowmobile Clubs (506) 325-2625. A trail pass is required and you must have personal liability insurance, by New Brunswick law, on your snowmobile. The insurance can be from your state of origin and must be available for viewing if asked for by a peace officer. Collision, theft and fire insurance are recommended but not mandatory.

6) You must have your snowmobile registered, by New Brunswick law, in your state of origin.

TIPS TO SAFE SNOWMOBILING

  • Travel in groups and inform some responsible person of your plans. Fill out a trip itinerary.
  • Know your machine and its capabilities.
  • Respect the rights and property of others.
  • If it is necessary to travel on frozen bodies of waters, do so with extra caution.
  • When crossing a highway be sure the way is clear and cross as directly as possible.
  • Know and obey Maine snowmobile laws.
  • Do not use your machine to harass wildlife, or in areas frequented by game.

TRAIL ETHICS

  • I will always operate at a reasonable and prudent speed for trail conditions;
  • I will always drive to the right side of the trail and park to the right in single file or stop off the edge of the groomed surface;
  • I will not pass unless recognized and motioned to pass by the snowmobile operator ahead;
  • I will respect the trail groomer operator and leave the trail in the same condition I found it;
  • I will not drink and drive;
  • I will not ride on plowed roads except at legal crossings.

JUDGING ICE CONDITIONS

"Thick and blue, tried and true.  Thin and crispy, way to risky."

The ice traveler should look for bluish ice that is at least 4 to 6 inches thick, in order to support people and their gear.  Even if the weather has been below freezing for several days, don't guess about ice thickness.  Check ice in several places.  Use an auger, spud, or axe to make a test hole, beginning at shore and continuing as you go out.

If ice at the shoreline is cracked or squishy, stay off.  Don't go on the ice during thaws.  Watch out for thin, clear or honeycomb-shaped ice.  Dark snow and dark ice are other signs of weak spots.

Choose small bodies of water.  Rivers and lakes are prone to wind and wave action, which can break ice up quickly.  Avoid areas with currents, around bridges and pressure ridges.

In the wintertime, outdoor enthusiasts frequently need to know how thick the ice is and whether it is safe to walk across it.  The American Pulpwood Association has published a hand reference chart that gives a good rule-of-thumb for ponds and lake ice thickness.

This table is for clear, blue ice on lakes.  Reduce the strength values by 15% for clear blue river ice.  Slush ice is only one-half the strength of blue ice.  This table does not apply for parked loads. 

Ice Thickness
(in inches)
Permissible Load - Clear, Blue Lake Ice
(Reduce strength values for other types of ice)
   
2 One person on foot
3 Group of people walking single file
7-1/2 Passenger car (2 ton gross)
8 Light truck (2-1/2 ton gross)
10 Medium truck (3-1/2 ton gross)
12 Heavy truck (7-8 ton gross)
15 Heavy truck (10 ton gross)
20 25 tons
25 45 tons
30 70 tons
36 110 tons

What if I break through the ice?

  • If you break through the ice, don't panic.
  • Don't try to climb out - you'll probably break the ice again.
  • Lay both arms on the unbroken ice and kick hard.  This will help lift your body onto the ice.  Roll to safety.
  • To help someone who has fallen in, lie down flat and reach with a branch, plank, or rope; or form a  human chain.  Don't stand.  After securing the victim, wiggle backwards to the solid ice.
  • The victim may need treatment for hypothermia (cold exposure), artificial respiration or CPR.

"If your feet are cold, put on your hat."

That may seem odd, but it's good advice.  Most of our body heat is lost through your head and neck.  So wear a hat and cover your face and neck.

Dress in layers.  Wool, silk and certain synthetics are best; they'll keep you warm even if they're wet.

Insulated, waterproof boots, gloves and a windbreaker are very important.  Take extra clothing.

WARNING: Hypothermia is the
NUMBER ONE killer in the outdoors!


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Storm Center Alert - Bangor, Maine
January 1, 2014 - 19 Below Zero today at the airport.
December 30, 2013 - 11:00 AM
Bangor - about 9-10 inches new snow on top of the recent 4-5 inches. Maybe 18-20 inches on the ground.
Millinocket & JoMary Area - over 2 feet of snow on the ground.


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